Mustang Site Teachers of the Year

Editor’s note: As there are 16 Teachers of the Year throughout Mustang Public Schools, the Mustang News will print four at a time in Feb. 11 and Feb. 18 editions. The Teachers of the Year were not printed in any particular order.
Mustang’s Teacher of the Year will be announced this spring.

Liz Brown

Liz Brown
Mustang Central Middle School

Liz Brown is a six-year educator of teaching all subjects to fourth grade students and currently skill-builder math.
She received her Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education from the University of Phoenix and is working to obtain her Master of Arts in Education, Administration and Supervision.

Q&A

Why did you choose teaching?
I became a teacher later in life after staying home with my sons while they were young.
I was inspired to become an educator by the teachers who I and my sons were blessed to have in our lives.
I have always been impressed by how selflessly each teacher has worked to make sure that each student feels important and capable of reaching their full potential.

Describe how it felt when you found out that you had won.

I felt an overwhelming feeling of appreciation and gratitude to my fellow teachers for being recognized. This year has not been easy for any of us, and this honor could have easily been awarded to any one of the teachers I work with at my site.

What is the best thing about being at your school?

Being at Central is like being a part of a big, supportive family. The leadership at Central has done a phenomenal job of encouraging collegiality and collaboration by empowering teachers to be leaders and work together cohesively.

What is your goal as an educator?

My goal as an educator is to reach each student on an individual level. Each student has a unique set of needs, strengths and weaknesses, and it is my endeavor to meet each child where they are and help them reach a new level of success.

Sheila Kramer

Sheila Kramer
Riverwood Elementary

Sheila Kramer is a nine-year educator of teaching first grade.
She received her Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education from the University of Central Oklahoma. Some of Kramer’s accomplishments consist of being a mentor teacher for new incoming first grade instructors, being a team leader at various sites and more.

Q&A

Why did you choose teaching?

Teaching was not my first career choice when I graduated from high school. I come from a family of educators and remember people telling me I was destined to be a teacher like my mom. I usually just laughed because there was no way I was going to be a teacher. I didn’t know what degree path I would take; I just knew it wouldn’t be in education.
After I graduated with my associate degree in applied science, I was kind of at a crossroads of what I wanted to do with my future career goals. Steve Mendell, Superintendent of Lomega Public Schools, offered me a teaching assistant job at Lomega Elementary.
This is the school I grew up in and where my mom teaches. My original thoughts going in was that I would work there for a year or two while I decided what I wanted to do with my life. I got to work side-by-side with my own elementary teachers (including my mom) and see the love and hard work that they poured into each child that walked into their classrooms.
I quickly realized that I wanted to make a difference in children’s lives, like each one of them did. By Christmas break I had decided that I needed to go back to school to be a teacher.
By the spring semester I was enrolled in education classes. I worked as an assistant at Lomega for two years before going back to school full time.
I will forever be thankful for that time in the classroom. I took away so many ideas from those teachers that I still use in my classroom today.
Looking back, I’m not sure why I was so adamant about not being a teacher. I had amazing teachers growing up and I always looked up to them.
I just never saw myself as a teacher. I know that God had a hand in me getting that job, so I could realize that I really was meant to be a teacher and have a classroom of my own.

Describe how it felt when you found out that you had won.

Shocked and honored. I’m still in shock that I was chosen as Riverwood’s Teacher of the Year.
I work with some of the best educators, not only in the district, but also the state and nation. Even during this crazy year, they continue to come in every day and continue to make a difference to each child, who walks through our school doors. It is an honor to have been chosen by my peers to represent Riverwood.

What is the best thing about being at your school?

The people I work with! That includes everyone from principals, teachers, support staff, to cafeteria and janitors.
Everyone at Riverwood makes our school a truly unique and special place to work. It has a family atmosphere, where everyone works together. I’m blessed to be able to work there.

What is your goal as an educator?
As an educator, I have many goals for my students from academic goals to behavior goals. However, every year my biggest and most important goal for every student is that they know that they are loved. Having positive relationships with each student is helping to set the pathway to success for them in all areas.
I want my students to know that my classroom is a safe place for them. I also want my previous students to be able to look at their first-grade year with me and know they were loved unconditionally.

Cassidy Robinson

Cassidy Robinson
Centennial Elementary

Cassidy Robinson is a 16-year educator of teaching kindergarten.
She received her bachelor’s in early childhood education from Southern Nazarene University. Some of her accomplishments consist of being named a Teacher of the Year, a supervising teacher for student instructors and a mentor teacher for new educators.

Q&A

Why did you choose teaching?

My first job was in a daycare and I loved it! I loved working with the kids, planning the activities, and watching the kids learn and grow.
Even though I loved working with kids I thought I wanted to be a lawyer and enrolled in college as a political science major until I felt God calling me to be a teacher. I cannot imagine being a lawyer or anything else.

Describe how it felt when you found out that you had won.

I was shocked and grateful for the honor.

What is the best thing about being at your school?

Centennial is like a big family! I have been there since it opened and cannot imagine teaching anywhere else.

What is your goal as an educator?

My goal is for every child to progress academically, socially and emotionally from the beginning of the school year to the end. Every child learns in their own way and on their own time, and I try to foster an environment where every student can thrive.

Sarah Moody

Sarah Moody
Mustang Valley Elementary

Sarah Moody is a 16-year educator of teaching prekindergarten, kindergarten, first, second and fourth grade.
She received her bachelor’s in special education from UCO. Some of Moody’s accomplishments include being a certified Marzano evaluator, being awarded Making a Difference accolades, as well as Anything is Possible Mindset Matters.

Q&A

Why did you choose teaching?

I chose teaching because of my mother. She was my homeschool teacher through fifth grade and she made learning effortless and, most of all, fun.
She turned every single lesson into an interactive experience and had fun with it. As long as I can remember, I wanted to be just like my mom and share that love of learning.

Describe how it felt when you found out that you had won.

Surreal. The smiles on my students’ faces and the bear hug given to me by my daughter during the presentation were the absolute best part.

What is the best thing about being at your school?

The best thing about being at Valley is the feeling of family. Everyone who is a part of the Valley family (staff, families, community) support each other through the highs and the lows. That feeling is like none other.

What is your goal as an educator?

My goal is to make students excited about learning and for them to believe that they can achieve anything. I want them to come to school every day looking forward to what they are going to learn.
I want my students to laugh and smile even through the “hard stuff.” I want them to know I believe in them.

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