Former governor meets with local leaders

Former Oklahoma Gov. David Walters speaks Tuesday at the Positive Posse in Mustang. Also pictured are Wade Huckabay, the group’s moderator and president of All America Bank; the Rev. Jim Harris, pastor of Clear Springs Church; and (back of head) City Councilman Terry Jones. Photo / Chris Eversole

Former Oklahoma Gov. David Walters received a warm welcome Tuesday in a return visit to Mustang.
Walters, who served from 1991 through 1995, answered questions for nearly an hour at Positive Posse, an informal discussion group that meets at the Town Center.
Walters has visited the Positive Posse several times in the past, and sisters of his wife, Rhonda – Kathy Lyles and Deena Smith – live in Mustang.
The group’s moderator, Wade Huckabay, fondly recalled meeting Walters when he was a young man and his father, Gary Huckabay, was working with Walters to secure funding for a bridge over the South Canadian River to quickly link Tuttle with Mustang – and with the rest of the Oklahoma City metro.
Walters committed to putting in place the planning for the bridge.
“He said he would get it so far along that no future governor could figure out how to stop it,” Wade Huckabay said.
That, indeed, was the case, and the bridge opened in 2002.
Today, Walters is on the Democratic National Committee and its executive committee.
A month ago, the Walters hosted Mike Bloomberg at their home in the Quail Creek area as a way of introducing the former New York City mayor and 2020 presidential candidate to key stakeholders in Oklahoma.
The gathering attracted not only Democrats but also Republicans, Walter said.
“Two of the Republicans changed their voter registration to Democrat the next day,” Walters said.
Although his role on the DNC prevents him from endorsing Bloomberg, Walters said he admires the billionaire.
“I like his business sense, and he did good things in New York,” Walters said.
“I’m intrigued by him, and I can see him pulling the country together,” Walters said.
Walters, 68, also discussed his current business, Walters Power International, which builds electric generating plants around the world.
The business finds niche opportunities to construct relatively small plants in locations – including Pakistan, West Africa and England – where large corporations aren’t interested, he said.
His company uses a variety of energy sources, including wind, solar and natural gas, Walters said.
He applauded the federal government for providing tax credits subsidizing renewal energy over the years to the point that clean energy now is able to sustain itself.
Walters discussed President Donald Trump.
Trump was right to say that the federal government needs reform, but he went too far, Walters said.
“Deconstruction was a policy,” he said.
“It’s not enough to tear the place down.”

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