Mustang to stick with ACT as state exam, focus on enrollment increase

Enrollment numbers and state assessment testing highlighted the Mustang Public Schools School Board Meeting on Monday at Canyon Ridge Intermediate School.
Despite several other large school districts in Oklahoma (including Yukon Public Schools) switching from the ACT to the SAT when it comes to curriculum, Mustang has decided to stay with the ACT as its assessment exam.
The State Department of Education is no longer using the End of Instruction (EOI) exams as its state assessment, which leaves each public school district with the choice of using the ACT or the SAT to do their assessment testing.
Mustang Public Schools superintendent Dr. Sean McDaniel said he believes both the ACT and SAT tests are quality exams, but he believes the ACT is the best choice for Mustang this year.
“We are very invested as a state and a district in the ACT,” McDaniel said. “Our students are very familiar with the ACT. The SAT is a great exam and there are handful of districts that are headed in that direction and we may to at some point but the decision here was we want to have continued conversations with the ACT folks to see if the timing of them taking the test items and prep items to the younger levels is going to happen.
“We have been told it is going to happen but that is one advantage that the SAT does have. They start preparing kids earlier, so we want to give the ACT one more year and if it plays out and they do move down to the lower grades than we will be happy we stuck with them.”
When it comes to enrollment, Mustang Public Schools is one of the leaders in growth in the state. Since the 1990-1991 school year, Mustang has grown from 5,575 students in the district to 11,439 as of right now in the 2017-2018 school year.
The final numbers for this school year will not be calculated until Oct. 1 per State of Oklahoma law.
Since the 2003-2004 schoolyear, Mustang had an enrollment of 7,188. They grew five percent in the next year and since then, have jumped five percent in enrollment numbers three times and never had less than a one percent growth rate.
The new elementary school and new intermediate school are currently under construction and will be placed towards the north side of the district since that is where the majority of the growth is taking place for Mustang.
Currently, there are four elementary schools on the north side of the district, one intermediate and one middle school. The total number of students on the north side is 4,823.
There are 2,833 elementary students on the north side with a maximum occupancy of 2,990, which puts the elementary facilities at 95 percent occupancy on the north side.
There are 1,047 students at Canyon Ridge Intermediate with a maximum occupancy of 1,000, which puts the intermediate facility at four percent over maximum occupancy on the north side of the district.
There are 943 students at Mustang North Middle School with a maximum occupancy of 1,000, which puts the middle school facility at 94 percent occupancy.
The south side of the district has much better numbers when it comes to facility space for Mustang. Currently, there are three elementary schools on the south side, one intermediate school and one middle school.
The total number of students on the south side of Mustang’s district is 3,222.
There are 1,669 elementary students on the south side with a maximum occupancy of 2,050, which puts the elementary facilities at 81 percent occupancy on the south side.
There are 764 students at Horizon Intermediate with a maximum occupancy of 840, which puts the intermediate facility at 91 percent occupancy on the south side of the district.
There are 789 students at Mustang Middle School with a maximum occupancy of 1,200, which puts the middle school facility at 66 percent occupancy.
Perhaps the biggest concern when it comes to space at Mustang Public Schools is at the high school level.
There are 3,068 students at Mustang High School with a maximum occupancy of 3,500, which puts the high school facility at 88 percent occupancy.
As of right now, there are no plans to add on to the high school but with the continuing growth rate at Mustang Public Schools, there was concern from the school board on the space three-to-five years down the road.
The idea of building a separate freshmen academy was brought up but there is no plan in place for any additions at this point.
On the athletic side of the table, Mustang Public Schools Director of Athletics Robert Foreman reported that there were between 8,900 and 10,000 people in attendance at the annual Mustang vs. Yukon football game.
The total gate revenue from the game was $41,752.42 and after the second home game of the season against Norman last Friday, the total gate revenue for Mustang football through two weeks is slightly above $52,000.

Leave a Comment